• ITVI.USA
    13,670.690
    -217.880
    -1.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.060
    -0.040
    -0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,638.790
    -223.800
    -1.6%
  • TLT.USA
    2.800
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
    -3.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
    -0.270
    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,670.690
    -217.880
    -1.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.060
    -0.040
    -0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,638.790
    -223.800
    -1.6%
  • TLT.USA
    2.800
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
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  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
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    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
CanadaIntermodalInternationalMaritimeNews

Port of Montreal longshore workers threaten to strike Monday

Intermodal trucking executive hopeful union, port employers can avert disruption

The union representing Port of Montreal longshore workers threatened an indefinite strike on Monday in a move that could severely disrupt operations at Canada’s second-largest port. 

The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) said the strike will begin Monday morning in the event it does not reach an agreement with port employers. 

The Montreal Port Authority warned that the strike will lead to a suspension of berthage and goods-handing services normally handled by longshore workers. Liquid bulk and grain terminal operations wouldn’t be impacted. 

“A prolonged stoppage in port operations has major repercussions for Canadian businesses that depend on international trade and, ultimately, for the supply of goods and services to the public,” the port authority said in a statement. 

Longshore workers have already held three limited strikes since July. CUPE and the Maritime Employers Association have been locked in contract talks since 2018. Longshore workers are seeking higher pay and changes in hours and working conditions.

Corey Darbyson, director of Transport Dsqaure, a Montreal-based intermodal trucking company that services the port, said he was optimistic that the union and port employers will reach an agreement for a new contract.

“Hopefully they can get to the table and bang this out,” Darbyson told FreightWaves. “They should work together and come to an agreement so we can continue to move essential goods.”

Click for more FreightWaves articles by Nate Tabak.

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Nate Tabak, Border and North America Correspondent

Nate Tabak is a Toronto-based journalist who covers cross-border trucking, logistics and trade for FreightWaves. Before moving to Canada, he spent seven years reporting stories in the Balkans and Eastern Europe as a reporter, producer and editor based in Kosovo. He previously worked at newspapers in the San Francisco Bay Area, including the San Jose Mercury News. He graduated from UC Berkeley, where he studied the history of American policing. Contact Nate at ntabak@freightwaves.com.